Accufit

AccuFit
The ever changing career of optometry has added a new piece of equipment for our optical to utilize. This device is the Accufit, and it is exclusive to LensCrafters. It is an advanced system that takes precise measurements of the face and pupils so the lenses are aligned in the most accurate position in the frame.

You may be wondering how this works. I only know what I have read about it online, and I will explain it the best I can. First, you will pick out the pair of frames that you would like to purchase. The optician will then adjust the frame to fit your face correctly, so the glasses won’t slip or pinch your nose too much. Next, they will attach a bracket that has many sensors. AccuFit infrared You will sit in front of an infrared camera, and the device will make many measurements concerning the exact position of the pupils, so the lenses can have the prescription in the perfect place for your best vision.

This machine not only takes measurements, but it also takes pictures of you in the frames, so you can decide which frame looks best on you. This new piece of technology will enhance the frame selection process, and provide the best vision possible through your new glasses!

Every new piece of technology is designed to serve our patients better. As optometrist we desire to give our patients the very best vision possible, whether that’s with glasses, contacts, or other refractive correction. This new device allows us to come closer to the best correction possible for your glasses!

 

Here’s a brief video explaining the new Accufit system:

 

Andrew Yoder

I am a 3rd year intern at the UIW Rosenberg School of Optometry. I was home grown in Dyersville, IA. I have a brother and sister, of which I am the youngest. My hobbies include playing ultimate frisbee, basketball, tennis, and anything else my friends want to play, and jamming out on my guitar.

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UIW Eye Institute Optical

imageHere at RSO we have a fully functional optical lab. We have at least five clinics for which we trace, cut, edge, and fit lenses into frames. This means there is always an abundance of orders to be completed on a daily basis.

You will learn and be competent on all the lab equipment, so you will be able to take a frame with no lenses all the way to the end product, and be able to fit them on the patient correctly.

In the optical, you not only learn the art of making glasses, but you also will be interacting with patients; helping them pick out a frame to fit their needs, dispensing their completed glasses, and fitting and adjusting their glasses before they leave. You will also learn how to interact with frame companies and how to look up benefits from insurance carriers.

Each week, during your 3rd year, you will have at least one day of optical. Some of your days will be extremely busy, with many patients looking for new glasses or adjustments, other days will be slower, and you will get to spend more time in the lab cutting lens and making sure the final products are within tolerances. In the optical, we carry hundreds of frames, from economic frames to higher end frames like Ray Ban and Fendi.

You will have to learn how to establish what style and price range a patient is looking for. This is an art, and not so much a science. In our optical, you will be lead by some excellent opticians that will teach you their art.

Sunglasses Rack
Sunglasses Rack

You may be wondering, “what exactly goes into making a pair of glasses?”

Well first, you start out with a frame, which has no lenses. Depending on what lenses the patient orders will determine how soon we will receive the stock lenses from the vendor. We have a few vendors that we order our lenses from: Paragon and Hoya are the major companies.

The patient also has many other choices to make; will they choose anti-glare coating, transitions, high index, single vision, bifocal, or progressive. We make many single vision lenses, meaning there is only one power of prescription in the lens, where bifocals and progressives have a separate prescription in the top portion for distance vision and in the bottom for near vision. Anti-glare coating reduces the amount of reflections that people will see on your glasses from the sun or overhead lights.

It will also decrease the glare from on-coming headlights when driving at night or reflections from computer screens.

Many of you know what transition lenses are, they react to UV radiation from the sun and darken when outside in the sunlight, but when you come back inside the lenses lighten until they are almost completely clear. People will either love or hate transition lenses. It all depends on the patient and their needs.

High index allows the lens to be thinner and is useful in high prescriptions. Any of these upgrades make the lens a premium lens, so there is an extra price the patient will pay.

So, now that we have the lenses in our hands, we are ready to trace and edge the lenses, so we can fit them in the frame. First, we use the tracer. This machine takes thousands of readings per millimeter, so the lenses will fit perfectly in the frame.

Lens Tracer
Lens Tracer

After we have the frame traced, we can get the lenses cut. This is when we put the lens in the edger, and it uses the readings from the tracer to cut and edge the lenses perfectly.

Lens Edger
Lens Edger

Once the machine is done cutting the lens, we can fit it in the frame, and now you are halfway done with the pair of glasses. Now you will complete the same process for the other lens. Lastly, we will clean and check the lenses on the lensometer to make sure they meet the tolerances set for every type of lens. A lensometer allows us to check the prescription in a pair of glasses.

Auto Lensometer
Auto Lensometer

Now the glasses are ready to be dispensed to their owner!

There are many choices to navigate your patient through, but we are always trying to give the patient the lens that will suit their needs well. It may seem confusing right now, but through the many different courses during your first two years, you will be well equipped to help these patients!

This year our optical hosted a trunk show at the Rosenberg School of Optometry. A trunk show is an event where the vendors for our optical bring in many styles of frames and offer discounted rates on the glasses for that day. This year we had many vendors come in, such as: Ray Ban, Dolce and Gabana, Fendi, and a few others. These shows are a great way to see a variety of different style frames from the vendors and get an amazing deal on some designer frames!

Frame Styles
Frame Styles

In the UIW Eye Institute Optical you will learn everything you need to know in order to measure, cut and fit frames and lenses on patients. At first it may feel overwhelming because of the many different elements to being successful in the optical, but with time you will master the skills required. Have no fear; you will have plenty of chances to become comfortable with the many different machines that we use in the optical lab. This is just one aspect of your optometric career that will prove to be very rewarding!

Andrew Yoder

I am a 3rd year intern at the UIW Rosenberg School of Optometry. I was home grown in Dyersville, IA. I have a brother and sister, of which I am the youngest. My hobbies include playing ultimate frisbee, basketball, tennis, and anything else my friends want to play, and jamming out on my guitar.

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San Antonio Smorgasbord-Spaghetti Warehouse

SpaghettiMamma Mia! If you find yourself starving after watching Ratatouille, then Spaghetti Warehouse may be the restaurant for you. Their unique dining atmosphere includes a home-style/diner eating area, and if you are lucky, you may be seated in the trolley that is the center piece of the restaurant. Come out and enjoy a heaping pile of spaghetti with meatballs, or any other Italian mainstay.

You will not leave this restaurant without feeling completely full! If you do have a small area of your stomach that is unfilled, then you can top it off with a massive dessert of a brownie a la mode, or maybe some New York style cheesecake!

I got the classic spaghetti with meatballs, it was more than enough to fill me up, with the Caesar salad and bread that comes with every meal. I was even able to bring half of it home to eat for lunch sometime this week! So, if you are already craving some of that spicy Italian good-ness then go on down to Spaghetti Warehouse.
Spaghetti Warehouse

Here is the location:
Address: 1226 E Houston St, San Antonio, TX 78205
Phone:(210) 299-1114

Andrew Yoder

I am a 3rd year intern at the UIW Rosenberg School of Optometry. I was home grown in Dyersville, IA. I have a brother and sister, of which I am the youngest. My hobbies include playing ultimate frisbee, basketball, tennis, and anything else my friends want to play, and jamming out on my guitar.

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Finals Week

Alas, the dreaded finals week is upon us! We all know it will happen and some of us choose to ignore the fact that it will occur after every semester of school, regardless of if we want it to or not. Some students look forward to finals because it means the end of the semester, and there is a break very near. Others dread finals for the obvious reasons. Whether or not you like taking finals, they are a fact of life, so we must carry on. books

In optometry school, you will no doubt have 6 or 7 finals after every semester, and maybe a few lab finals as well until your third year, where clinic becomes a vast majority of your school day. To be honest, I still don’t know how I make it through finals week every time. I guess you just put your nose to the grind stone, and get through it. Our finals, here at UIWRSO, are set up so we have 1 per day, and on occasion 2, and they are usually in the morning. So, if you are a night owl, you can pull an all-nighter, take the test, go home and sleep for a few hours, and then do it all again. I am definitely not an “all-nighter.” Some of my friends call me a grandpa because I like to go to bed by 10:30pm, so the next day I may take a short nap after the test and then study all day, and get to bed so I can get at least 7 hours of rest. I’m sure you have all heard somebody talk about a study that has shown that people perform better when getting an adequate amount of sleep. Now, we are all adults, and know our own strategy for taking tests, so to each their own.

Well, on Friday August 2, 2013, I had my first final for this semester in Research Methodology. This class is focused on how to perform research correctly, and how to analyze the data you receive from research. We had normal class in the morning from 7:30am to 10:00am and our final was at 10:00am. It was a short 50 question comprehensive final. It was only a 1.0 credit hour class, so it was not that difficult, but a few of my other tests will be!

The weekend was full of studying. I woke up Saturday morning and studied all day. I was able to take a break Saturday night and get in some good relaxation. After church Sunday morning I was back at it, studying until the sun went down. Even after all of that studying I did not feel completely ready for my test on Monday. I had studied as much as I could, and I just had to do my best. My test on Monday was in Pathology of the Posterior Segment II. In this class you learn about many of the disease processes that can affect the back of the eye. It is difficult, but will help you clinically. The rest of my Monday was, again, filled with studying for most of the day. My test on Tuesday was in Advanced Contact Lens, and was not as difficult as my test on Monday. In Advanced Contact Lens you will learn about all the very different modes and types of contact lens. Also, you will learn to recognize contact lens related diseases and how to treat them.

Tuesday morning arrived, again, I woke up at 6:00am to prepare myself to take another grueling test. Luckily, the material in Advanced Contact Lens was not as difficult as Posterior Segment. The test came and went, just as any other tests would. My Tuesday afternoon consisted of taking a nap to rejuvenate, and then studying for Case Analysis. This class focuses on teaching you to think like a clinician. A majority of the lectures are case presentations where as a class we ask questions and determine diagnoses of many different cases. You may wonder what the final for this class will consist of, well, you will be tested over the different cases presented in class. They will provide specific information about the case and you will make the best diagnosis based on the information.

Wednesday at 6:00am I again reviewed a few lectures and prepared for my test at 7:30am! The test was a blur, like all the rest. The test coming up on Thursday, won’t be a walk in the park though, so after my test Wednesday morning, I had to hit the books hard. Thursday’s test was in Strabismus and Amblyopia, when you get to this class you will understand. This class is tough, but you will leave feeling more confident in your skills. You will learn all about eye turns/deviations and begin to learn how to recognize and how to manage these cases clinically. EyeChart

My Thursday morning was exactly like the rest. I was more nervous about this test though. It was going to be difficult, and I spent every minute that morning reviewing and trying to make sure I was ready for that test. It was a tough test, but as long as you prepare well, you will perform well. By this time there was a light at the end of the tunnel. Tomorrow morning would be the last final of the summer! It was in our glaucoma course. This class is focused on the clinical aspect of glaucoma diagnosis and management. It is a very useful class. Everything you learn will apply clinically. By the time you finish the final you will have a good idea on how to diagnose and treat glaucoma. My Thursday afternoon was not as intense, I took a few hours to relax and play some racquetball. My studying on Thursday afternoon was sub-par, at best. I was able to get through all the lectures, but it was very difficult to stay focused.

Friday morning came around, and I woke up at 6:30am this morning. The glaucoma test was not easy, but it was our easiest final of the six we took. I looked over a few things Friday morning, but I was not as worried about this test. The final came and went, and I remember walking out of the test room and feeling free! It was time to get some R&R and enjoy not studying for a whole week!

Finals weeks are always the same in optometry school. They are intense, but you always find a way to get through it. You put your nose to the grind, and spend most of your waking hours of that week studying. In the end it is worth it. Receiving good grades is great, but to be honest, sometimes just passing is a relief. In the end, hard work does pay off! If you are reading this and it is your finals week, then keep your chin up, it will be over soon. If you have made it to this point then you are smart enough, just hang in there!

Andrew Yoder

I am a 3rd year intern at the UIW Rosenberg School of Optometry. I was home grown in Dyersville, IA. I have a brother and sister, of which I am the youngest. My hobbies include playing ultimate frisbee, basketball, tennis, and anything else my friends want to play, and jamming out on my guitar.

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Total Dailies 1

The ever changing career of optometry has yet another advance in contact lens technology. Alcon has released brand new technology that, they say, will change how we fit contact lenses. Here at UIWRSO, we had the privilege to attend a presentation on the new Total Dailies 1!

Many of you who read this blog are soft contact lens wearers. You know how uncomfortable and annoying your lenses can be at times. Well, if this is you, then these new lenses may be the answer to all your pain. Alcon has recently released their newest line of soft contact lenses. They boast a new type of technology called “Water Gradient Technology.” What this means is the core of the lens has less water than the outer surface of the lens. This is important because the core is made of silicone, which allows more oxygen to transmit through the lens, and the high water content outer surface allows better comfort with all-day wear.
Total DailiesNow you may be asking, “how is this different from any other lens?”

Well, up until now, scientist have only been able to make contact lenses out of a single material. What most current soft contact lenses are made of is silicone hydrogel. Silicone hydrogel has excellent comfort and oxygen transmission, but because of the nature of silicone hydrogel, it is not a very “wettable” material, so it makes you more aware of the lenses, and is more uncomfortable as the day goes on.

Studies report that nearly 48% of patients quit wearing their lenses because of discomfort. This is where the new water gradient technology comes into play. Since the outer surface is nearly 100% water, it provides an extremely wettable surface that allows comfortable all-day wear. This is the only lens of its kind. So, if you are one of those people that experience uncomfortable contact lens wear, schedule an appointment with your local optometrist, or if you’re in San Antonio, you can make an appointment with the UIW Eye Institute, and maybe you too can experience the “WOW” factor of the new Alcon Dailies Total 1.

Check out the video for a brief description:

 

Andrew Yoder

I am a 3rd year intern at the UIW Rosenberg School of Optometry. I was home grown in Dyersville, IA. I have a brother and sister, of which I am the youngest. My hobbies include playing ultimate frisbee, basketball, tennis, and anything else my friends want to play, and jamming out on my guitar.

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